Update! I've updated my slate config to use JavaScript. The new grid is much easier to use and much more accurate. SlateGrid.js and my current slate config.

If you ever found apps like Divvy or SizeUp lacking, you should check out slate window manager. It is a free, open-source window manager for OSX that is very customizable.

A huge bonus of Slate is that it allows you to setup window layouts - specific places for specific windows. This is great for different scenarios: working, dealing with email, chatting, etc. Just setup a different layout and toggle between them when switching tasks for added productivity. The up-front cost kind of sucks, but it can be worth it.

One of the things I was struggling with was creating basic window layouts with it, and I devised a bootstrap-like grid "framework" for it. What it does is try to create a generic 12x12 grid on the screen, so you can push and pull app windows into specific coordinants, similar to how a CSS framework would do it.

The framework really just sets up some slate aliases that let you set window dimensions in a more human-friendly way. The aliases break down into 4 main categories:

span-{x}
Set the width of the window to X columns (1/12th of screen width)
row-{x}
Set the height of the window to X rows (1/12th of the screen)
push-{x}
Move the window X columns to the right
drop-{x}
Move the window X rows from the top

When using these with slate's move command you can quickly and easily setup a window arrangement that suits your needs.

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As we all know, iTunes is opinionated, but we can lessen that with a few defaults write commands. One thing that is annoying is their new PING feature, which I consider useless. Another thing is their Store Arrows which can be obnoxious. This will reverse those and make it so the PING icon is hidden, and the store arrows actually search within your library. (This is common knowledge, but useful nonetheless)

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